Growing up with dad Tony Robbins taught Josh Robbins the value of the intentional and unapologetic splurge.

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Growing up with dad Tony Robbins taught Josh Robbins the value of the intentional and unapologetic splurge.  Josh Robbins shares the no-regrets story of his 11-year old self blowing a huge sum of money on one of the most memorable days of his life. 

In Josh’s money story you will learn:

-The lessons Josh learned being behind the scenes at his dad, Tony Robbins events

-How at age 11 Josh started his own business 

-Josh’s sales strategy

-The unexpected way Josh spent his profits

In Josh’s lesson you will learn:

-Josh’s philosophy on material goods vs. experiences

-His thoughts on whether he should have invested his profits in the market

-Josh’s take on side-hustles

-Josh’s advice on how to find more time to accomplish your goals

-Josh’s warning about social media and Netflix

In Josh’s Money Tip you will learn:

-How to find out what fees your are paying in your 401(k)

-How the law concerning 401(k) fee disclosure has changed

-What level of fees is considered too high

-What to do if your plan is costing you too much

-The financial consequences of even a 1 percent increase in fees

In my take you will learn:

-Why I at first disagreed with Josh’s financial decision, and how he changed my perspective

-The value of shared experiences and the memories from them 

-The financial impact of how you choose to spend you time, not just your money

-Strategies to invest in yourself

Episode links:

To check what you are paying in your 40 (k) go to showmethefees.com

To learn more about Josh Robbins and America’s Best 401 (k)

AB401k.com

Tony Robbins donates all of his book proceeds to Feeding America. 

To learn more about Tony Robbins Feeding America: http://www.feedingamerica.org/

Follow Josh Jenkins-Robbins

Twitter @jenkinsrobbins

Facebook: Josh Jenkins-Robbins

 

 
Growing up with dad Tony Robbins taught Josh Robbins the value of the intentional and unapologetic splurge. Josh Robbins shares the no-regrets story of his 11-year old self blowing a huge sum of money on one of the most memorable days of his life. In this Financial Grownup podcast episode you'll learn how even a 1% increase in fees can have consequences and the ways you can invest in yourself. #InvestInYourself #Money

Growing up with dad Tony Robbins taught Josh Robbins the value of the intentional and unapologetic splurge. Josh Robbins shares the no-regrets story of his 11-year old self blowing a huge sum of money on one of the most memorable days of his life. In this Financial Grownup podcast episode you'll learn how even a 1% increase in fees can have consequences and the ways you can invest in yourself. #InvestInYourself #Money

 

Transcription

Josh Robbins:
I would love to say I was really smart, and I saved it, and I stuck it in the market, and today, it's worth a million bucks. But I actually took it home, got about 10 of my friends, rounded them up, and we all went to the local fair that happened to be in town during that time in the summer. We had the most fun time ever. We spent all thousand dollars, walked in there with nothing.

Bobbi Rebell:
You're listening to Financial Grownup, with me, Certified Financial Planner Bobbi Rebell, author of How to Be a Financial Grownup. And you know what? Being a grownup is really hard, especially when it comes to money, but it's okay. We're going to get there together. I'm going to bring you one money story from a financial grownup, one lesson, and then my take on how you can make it your own. We got this.

Bobbi Rebell:
Hey friends. Today's story is about living your life, not your bank account. I'm not talking about being irresponsible like blowing your child's college fund or not saving for retirement. I'm just saying it is okay to give yourself permission to enjoy what you earned. Create memories with your friends and family. Josh Robbins is the Chief Strategy Officer at America's Best 401K, which is a major disruptor in the retirement business, one that I actually talk about in my book, How to Be a Financial Grownup. Josh is also the proud son of Tony Robbins, whom I have had the pleasure of interviewing a number of times and who contributed both a story and the foreword to my book as well.

Bobbi Rebell:
Josh, of course, as you can imagine, had an unconventional childhood to say the least, and as an adult, he is truly living by his father's life philosophies. This was a great conversation for me, because it reminded me that we have to live our lives and create great experiences with those we love. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Here is Josh Robbins. Josh Robbins, you are at Financial Grownup. Welcome to the podcast.

Josh Robbins:
It's great to be here. Thanks for having me.

Bobbi Rebell:
I can't believe it's been almost a year since we met. We met at the Nasdaq. Your family was being honored because of your dad's charity, Feeding America, and how many millions of meals has that been?

Josh Robbins:
Gosh. You know what? It's already ... He donated the profits from both of his financial books Money: Master the Game and Unshakable. And so, now, it's over 300 million meals.

Bobbi Rebell:
Oh my gosh.

Josh Robbins:
And now, they're on track to do a hundred million meals a year for the next seven years. So they'll have done a billion meals just through the profits and through also, just through matching. So, at Feeding America, if anybody's listening, wants to make a donation, Tony will match it. I think it's feedingamerica.com/tonyrobbins. Really simple. So he's committed to making a difference.

Bobbi Rebell:
It's interesting because you grew up in a very interesting environment, where you would be backstage at your father's events. Tell me your money story. You were a little entrepreneur, at what age? 11?

Josh Robbins:
Yeah. I was always trying to figure out how to hustle and run around and make money. And so, Tony has these big seminars. And back then, they'd be like these marathon events like 10 days long. There was one, that I remember in particular, where there's about 5,000 people there. So every lunch and dinner, they'd go out to these big giant tents, these meal tents, where people were sitting down eating, and I pounced on that opportunity to work on my sales skills.

Bobbi Rebell:
What did you do, Josh?

Josh Robbins:
I ended up buying these key chains that were really inexpensive.

Bobbi Rebell:
Do you remember what your cost was?

Josh Robbins:
I think my cost was a buck, and I was selling them for like three to four.

Bobbi Rebell:
Nice. Big profit.

Josh Robbins:
Yeah. So, big profit margin, and everybody loved it, because I'd come to the table. I think everybody just loved the idea that an 11-year-old was kind of selling [crosstalk 00:03:29]-

Bobbi Rebell:
You were probably milking that cuteness, you know?

Josh Robbins:
Yeah, well, it's like girl scout cookies, like what? Are you going to say no? So, anyway, it was fun. I ended up raking in about a thousand bucks over the course of this event.

Bobbi Rebell:
Oh my gosh. Wait, so, $1,000, like, what's the math on that? $3 each. Oh my gosh. You were selling a lot of key chains.

Josh Robbins:
A lot of key chains. I think everybody in that event had those key chains at the end, and I'm sure they all felt super obligated to buy one too. So, it was great.

Bobbi Rebell:
But it was a high quality key chain, I'm sure.

Josh Robbins:
Oh it was incredible. I'm sure they're still around today.

Bobbi Rebell:
All right, so you walk away with a thousand bucks. So that, first of all, that's a great, great story because that's your entrepreneurial venture and you're learning. But then what happened to the money? You go home, then what?

Josh Robbins:
I would love to say I was really smart, and I saved it, and I stuck it in the market, and today, it's worth a million bucks. But I actually took it home, got about 10 of my friends, rounded them up, and we all went to the local fair that happened to be in town during that time in the summer, and we had the most fun time ever. We spent all thousand dollars, walked in there with nothing.

Bobbi Rebell:
In one day?

Josh Robbins:
In one day, played every game, wrote every ride, and just did every possible thing you could want to do at the fair, and my friends were ecstatic, and I was ecstatic. It was beautiful because I learned a really valuable lesson, in the sense that, money is just a tool, right?

Bobbi Rebell:
Right.

Josh Robbins:
And money can be used to create incredible experiences. Stuff is fun for a little while, but experiences are really what life's about. And so, that was such a beautiful lesson for me. Obviously, saving, you know, I learned how to do ... learned that later, but that was a really, really beautiful lesson for me to have.

Bobbi Rebell:
Yeah, so, what is the takeaway then for our listeners? And by the way, where were the parents when this was going on?

Josh Robbins:
Great question. It's like a little bit of the Lord of the Flies stuff going on there.

Bobbi Rebell:
I know. I mean, I don't know. I feel like this is a different era that there are all these 11-year olds running around, spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars each at this day. It's interesting, because millennials now, at least as a stereotype, are into experiences. So is that the lesson for our listeners? There's a line though, there's a fine line, because as you said, if you had invested that $1,000, we could be having a different discussion.

Josh Robbins:
You're absolutely right. Yeah, I think look, for me, I think the takeaway is twofold. One, we're living in the day and age of the side hustle. You know, as Gary Vee would say, I think everybody needs to figure out how to create that additional money that they're going to be able to sock away. So, if they can have it from their job, great. But if they just say, "Hey, you know what? I can't make ends meet," there's always time. What's the average amount of time people watch TV these days? It's crazy.

Bobbi Rebell:
And not to mention social media.

Josh Robbins:
Oh social media. I mean, everything's time drain. So when people say they have no time, I just don't buy it. So, to me, I think creating that opportunity for yourself, to have financial freedom is incredible. So that's got to become a priority, because they can't afford it, right? But you got to pay yourself first. So in other words, let's just say tomorrow, the government raise taxes 10%. We'd all whine and moan, but we'd all end up paying, right?

Bobbi Rebell:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Josh Robbins:
And you got to think about your future the same way. You got to pay your future self in the same way. So, you know, I'm going to tax my current self 10% no matter what or more, but I'm going to do it for my future self. And yeah, it might create some cutbacks in the short term, but if you don't have the cutbacks, go out and get a side hustle. Make it happen.

Bobbi Rebell:
I know one thing you love to focus on, and it's something that we all need to focus on more, is fees.

Josh Robbins:
Yeah, I think one of the most interesting things is ... Tony went out and interviewed 52 top financial minds in the world, and it kept coming back to fees as one of the main themes, if you will. What I mean by that is most people have no idea. In fact, I just read a study recently that said 96% of people know exactly how much they spend for their Netflix account, but 71% of Americans think they pay no 401k fees whatsoever. That obviously is a financial literacy challenge, right? And by the way, that's not unusual. So if you don't know how much you paying in 401k fees, it's purposeful, right? It's opaque at best.

Bobbi Rebell:
Yes.

Josh Robbins:
For the first 30 years of the 401k's existence — it started in 1983 — up until 2012, they didn't have to tell you how much they were charging, how much they were extracting from your accounts. It's crazy. There's no disclosure.

Bobbi Rebell:
Right, but now they do. So, how specifically can people find out what the fees are? And how do you know if it's the right amount? Because it's okay to pay a little bit. I mean, people that are running it should get paid, but how do you find it out, and how do you know if you are paying too much?

Josh Robbins:
Great question. So now, they issue this thing called fee disclosures. So the challenge is they're very long and kind of opaque. But you as a participant, if you're on a 401k plan, you should request a copy of your fee disclosure, from whoever your current provider is, and they have to provide it to you. And then I'd start to do a little bit of archeology and take a look at that and uncover those fees. Now, we do that as a free service, which we can talk about later. But the point here is that you've got to uncover the fees, and I would say that 0.75% or less as the all-in fee, okay?

Josh Robbins:
I'm talking about the cost of the funds, the cost of the administration, the cost of what they call record-keeping, all of those should be 0.75% or less, and unfortunately, they're more like one and a half or two and a half particularly for small business. Bobbi, you know this. You know the impact of these fees. People say, "Oh it's only 1% or a small percent." Let me give you an example. If you have two people, two neighbors, both contributing to the 401k the same amount, both get the exact same returns in the market. Okay, and both take out the exact same amount at retirement, all things being equal.

Josh Robbins:
If one has 1% in fees while the other has 2% in fees, the person with 2% in annual fees will run out of money 10 years sooner than the person with 1% fees.

Bobbi Rebell:
Oh my gosh.

Josh Robbins:
10 years. A full decade, they're going to run out of money.

Bobbi Rebell:
And we're living longer, which is a good thing, but we need our money that we worked so hard for. So you are the Chief Strategy Officer at America's Best 401k, which I also by the way talk about in my book, How to Be a Financial Grownup, and how you are disrupting the industry. So tell us specifically what you offer and how people could use that to get this information and maybe make the right decision for them.

Josh Robbins:
We just say, "Hey, look, we're going to eliminate all the middlemen, all the brokers, all the unnecessary middlemen. We're going to offer low-cost index funds only, and then we're going to add a very one transparent advisory fee." So our typical plan is like 0.6% or less, all-in for everything. So, that's what we do, and we have a website for people that don't want to go through that whole financial archeology on their own. Whether you're a business owner, or you're an employee, or you're an employee that wants the business owner to pay attention, you can go to showmethefees.com.

Josh Robbins:
Showmethefees.com is a fee checker, where we allow ... We kind of give you like a ... I'm going to call it an initial estimate, kind of like Zillow does its estimate. So we're going to do the same thing. We're going to give you an estimate in the ballpark. And then if you want to take it one step further, all you have to do is just send us that fee disclosure that you can just get from, you know, call the toll-free number of your current provider and just ask them to send it to you and then upload it to us, and we'll help you uncover those fees. What you have to understand is if you're an employee, your employer's on the hook with the Department of Labor with legal liability to make sure that the plan is set up for the sole benefit of the employee.

Josh Robbins:
So they need to look at fee savings and cost savings opportunities. Employers want to know this stuff. And you as the employee can look like the hero, if you bring them a great opportunity to save a significant amount of money, because with just like the 1% and 2% example, when you compound it out over time, these 401ks can be firing on all cylinders, and right now, most of them are kind of limping along in mud. So, there's a lot of work to be done out there. We've got a long road to climb.

Bobbi Rebell:
All right. Well good stuff, Josh Robbins. Where could people find you if they want to follow you? Social media, all that stuff.

Josh Robbins:
Yeah, I'm at jenkinsrobbins.com. J-E-N-K-I-N-S-R-O-B-B-I-N-S. And then our company is at AB401k. A-B-4-0-1-K.

Bobbi Rebell:
Awesome. Thank you so much for joining us.

Josh Robbins:
Yeah, thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

Bobbi Rebell:
Hey friends. Here's my take on the story that Josh shared with us. Financial Grownup tip number one. Josh gave me a great reminder. A responsible splurge can be a good thing. So when he first told me that he spent all of his earnings on one fantastic day with his friends, at first, I thought the lesson, from his perspective, would be one of regret, wishing he had saved and invested the money. But in fact, decades later, he still has such incredible memories of that day. He really doesn't have any regrets, so I realized my gut was wrong. Now, if you're an adult, you have financial responsibilities. You can't necessarily go blow money from your kid's college fund on a great day with your buddies.

Bobbi Rebell:
But let's put this in context. It was one day's earnings, and he was a kid. He was 11. No one was depending on him. Here it is decades later. The memories of the shared experiences are priceless. Financial Grownup tip number two. Josh talks about making time for opportunity. He has some great reminders to create time for yourself and set yourself up for financial freedom. He points out that he and his dad, Tony Robbins, often hear people say they just don't have the time. Well to Josh's point, maybe watch a little less TV. Spend less time on social media. Find the time to invest in yourself, if that's a priority.

Bobbi Rebell:
Thanks to everyone for your support. If you have not already, please subscribe. If you have a free moment, reviews, totally appreciated. I know you guys are super busy. That's one of the reasons I keep the shows short. Be in touch. I am on Twitter, @bobbirebell and on instagram, @bobbirebell1. And for sneak peeks into upcoming episodes and some behind-the-scenes info about the podcast and my guests, get my newsletter. Just sign up at bobbirebell.com. I hope you enjoyed Josh Robbins' story and that we all got a little bit closer to being financial grownups.

Bobbi Rebell:
Financial Grownup, with Bobbi Rebell, is edited and produced by Steve Stewart and is a BRK Media production.